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Professional Resources

Children in Care

If you are an early years provider you may have a Child in Care (CiC) attending your setting.

CiC training

Many children and young people in care are vulnerable due to their experiences of serious loss or disruption to the relationship with their main care-giver, which leads to attachment difficulties.

This can have a huge impact on their social, emotional and behavioural development and is likely to affect their development and academic achievement.

There are two training sessions available: Attachment and Trauma and Emotion Coaching. Both sessions are delivered as in-house training by an Improvement Advisor to the staff team.

Attachment and Trauma

The training outlines the theory around trauma and early childhood attachments. The impact on a child’s development and capacity to cope in a learning environment is explored, alongside identifying helpful strategies for adults to use to support the child.

Aims:

  • Consider the barriers to learning for Children in Care.
  • Introduce an understanding of Attachment and Trauma, the issues and its effects on young children and how the setting can develop positive attachment.
  • To offer strategies and approaches to support children’s emotional and social development and attachment difficulties.

Emotion Coaching

This is a three-step approach to supporting a child to regulate their behaviour. Emotion Coaching enables children and young people to manage their own behaviour through helping them to understand the different emotions they experience, why they occur, and how to handle them.

Aims:

  • To enhance understanding about the effect of trauma and attachment difficulties on children’s development, behaviour and ability to regulate their emotions
  • To understand the theory behind Emotion Coaching and the benefits of using it in early years settings
  • To be familiar with the three-step Emotion Coaching approach and feel able to use it with children to improve self-regulation, behaviour and progress.
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