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Professional Resources

Infections

Infections vary and can have different resistances and ways of dealing with them.

Guidance on the most common infections.

Carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae

These are bacteria that live in the gut and are normally harmless but if they get into other parts of the body, such as the bladder or bloodstream, they can cause an infection.

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: non-acute and community toolkit – Gov.uk

Clostridium difficile (C-diff)

C-diff (sometimes written as CDI or CDT) is a bacterium in the bowel which causes diarrhoea and can sometimes cause serious bowel issues. C-Diff spores are very tough and can survive 6 to 12 months in the right environment which is why effective cleaning is crucial to killing the infection. Alcohol hand gel is useless against C-diff and you should use soap and water.

What is clostridium difficile? a simple guide - NHS East Leicestershire and Rutland clinical commissioning group   Opens new window

What is clostridium difficile? a simple guide - NHS Leicester City clinical commissioning group   Opens new window

What is clostridium difficile? a simple guide - NHS West Leicestershire clinical commissioning group   Opens new window

Primary care clinical guidelines - Leicestershire medicines strategy group has information about Clostridium difficile management.

Diabetes

A lifelong condition which results in a person’s blood sugars being too high.

Infection prevention and control guidelines of blood glucose monitoring in care homes – Gov.uk

Diarrhoea and vomiting (D&V)

One of the most common types of infections which is usually a viral infection and gets better on its own. D&V is easily spread so precautions should be put into place, such as source isolation, to reduce the spread of the infection. Alcohol hand gel is useless against D&V and you should use soap and water.

Norovirus: managing outbreaks in acute and community health and social care settings - Gov.uk

Action checklist for outbreaks of diarrhoea and vomiting   Opens new window

Hepatitis B

An infection of the liver, caused by a virus that's spread through blood and body fluids. It often doesn't cause any obvious symptoms in adults and typically passes in a few months without treatment. In children, it often persists for years and may eventually cause serious liver damage. 

Hepatitis B is less common in the UK than other parts of the world, but certain groups of people are at an increased risk; including people:

  • originally from high-risk countries
  • who inject drugs
  • who have unprotected sex with multiple sexual partners

A hepatitis B vaccine is available for people at high risk of the condition.

Hepatitis B – National institute for health and care excellence

Invasive group A streptococcal (iGAS)

Invasive group A streptococcal disease: managing close contacts – Gov.uk

Multi-resistant drug organism (MDRO)

Checklist for an individual case of a gram negative organism   Opens new window

Respiratory tract infections

Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) can affect the sinuses, throat, airways or lungs. Most RTIs get better without treatment, but sometimes you may need to see your GP. Alcohol hand gel is useful in killing respiratory infections as long as it contains 70% alcohol.

Action checklist for a respiratory outbreak   Opens new window

Flu (influenza)

Opens new window

Other respiratory

Catch it, bin it, kill it – Respiratory and hand hygiene campaign 2007-2008 - Department of health 

Scabies

A contagious skin condition, caused by tiny mites that burrow into the skin. Scabies transfer by prolonged skin to skin contact (usually 5 minutes or more), such as head lice. If you’re concerned that someone has caught scabies then you should contact a GP.

Action checklist for outbreaks of scabies   Opens new window

Urinary tract infection

Genito-urinary system – Leicestershire medicines strategy group

Wound care

Primary care clinical guidelines – Leicestershire medicines strategy group has information about Wound Care Formulary.

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